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Conan the Adventurer

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Average Rating:4.7 / 5
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Conan the Adventurer
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Conan the Adventurer
Publisher: Modiphius
by Ben S. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 05/18/2020 06:57:13

The first thing that struck me about this sourcebook was the wonderful art. Modiphius' art is usually of high quality but this time it seemed especially enticing. This book details character creation for the Southern Kingdoms, followed by in depth descriptions of the Kingdoms, large scale events that could be used for campaigns, and finally the large range of magic, gods and monsters that could be encountered. When I read and review a book, I try not to get caught up on, for instance, a reference being listed as page XX instead of a proper page number. Instead I look at style of writing and the images in the book to see if they give me inspiration to run fun and rivetting adventures. This book definitely did that, doing a great job of capturing the feel of the multitude of cultures in the Southern Kingdoms while consciously avoiding as best it can the unfortunate racist undertones (And sometimes not so -under-tones) of Robert E. Howard's stories.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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Conan the Adventurer
Publisher: Modiphius
by RODRIGO R. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 05/15/2020 11:40:02

This is an ok book, but it could have been a great source book. Maybe is too soon to write a review, and I think the publisher can edit a few typos. That's not the reason I granted the book the 3 / 5 ("average") rating.

The 3 / 5 rating isn't related to the art: the art follow Modiphius standards (it's great!). My verdict was settled due to inconsistencies and the want of a more elegant style (the way the information is presented):

  1. I failed to find in the book a description of the Stygian people (their phenotype), and if I’m not wrong the core book lacks it. I know there are the descendants of the “giant kings”, and they are tall and have lighter skin. But how about the majority of the population?

The other nations receive a better treatment. For example (p. 36): "The Darfari are a deeply dark-skinned, tall, and lithely muscled people with equally dark hair, often molded into symbolic shapes with twigs and dried mud, sometimes over a wooden base. The Darfari love to dance and chant, having ritual dances and chants for almost any activity."

  1. p. 65 mentions the Ammut demon and references p. 84. However, p. 84 says nothing on Ammut.

  2. The books fails to mention serpent men. The map (p. 30) shows a “lost colony of serpent men”, but says nothing about the place. Considering the book covers Stygia I can say it is a disappointment.

  3. Another place displayed in the map isn’t described at all: the monolith of Carcosa.

  4. Some locations mentioned in the text aren’t displayed in the map: the ford of Bubastes; the Bakhr river; the Purple Lotus Swamp.

  5. Minor inconsistencies. Compare the following two passages (both from page 65): “Whether this is a holdover from an earlier tribal version of the cult, or some mystical truism, it remains that the dead are important in Stygia. Petitioners often go to the tombs of their ancestors to ask for favors. For example, if a couple is childless, they may place letters at the tombs of their relatives asking them to speak to the gods in their favor for a child” x “Stygians place their dead in a Hall of the Dead, a broad dim-lit hall of colossal proportions in which rises tier upon tier of carven painted sarcophagi. Each stands in a niche in the black stone, and the tiers mount up and up to be lost in the gloom above. A Hall of the Dead is the silent grave of thousands of these mummies. Few see these halls save the silent priests of Set.” The first passage states the living relatives visit their dead often. The second passage state the dead are stored within Halls of the Dead, and that these buildings aren’t usually visited.

  6. Style issues (for example, p. 37). The section deals with conflict resolution withing Darfari society, but is interruped by a passage on foreign commerce:

"The method of handling intertribal conflict is much more complex but follows a pattern — and it is within this pattern that third parties enter Darfari affairs. If a villager commits some offense against a member of another clan or village, the wronged Darfari travels to a third-party village (or group) and demands to see their chief. When in the presence of the clan chief, the wronged Darfari explains that they were wronged, naming the village and the person who wronged him, informing the chief that the burden is now on them to correct the wrong. The third party Darfari and the wronged Darfari travel to the village of the offender, find the offender, and the third party Darfari demands payment for the offense. All parties then gather in front of a palaver house (the central hut where the headmen meet) and wait for the village to gather. When all have gathered, the parties tell their side of the story and talk it out in front of the village. If the village deems the offender guilty, the offender must either come to an agreement on how much will be paid to the party he offended and the third party, or risk sending the village into a pattern of raids and counter-raids between the three villages, which could escalate into a never-ending blood feud. The Darfari culture involves a third party to increase the cost of immoral behavior as a deterrent toward such acts. While largely hunter-gatherers, the Darfari do engage in some trade and this process may also be a way to involve adventurers in their affairs. The primary trading goods of the Darfari are cloth, salt, millet, and tobacco. When other methods of conflict resolution fail, raids between the clans and villages occurs. Raids typically happen at night and involve three raiding parties. One party, the ambushing party, hides along a trail leading from the raided village in the tall grasses, the swamps, or even the forest edges, and waits. A second party is the main war party, waiting on another trail. The third party consists of two men who walk into the village, knock on the door, and claim to be hungry travelers."

The few sentences on foreign commerce are sandwiched between the treatment of conflict resolution. That's bad style.

I still can recommend buying the sourcebook, but I hope next releases will not have the same issues.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
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Conan the Adventurer
Publisher: Modiphius
by kristine y. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 05/15/2020 10:09:38

this book focuses on the Southern lands of the world of Conan. Included in this book is tips for creating a charcter from this part of the world, various religions, and factions fromthe south. Several maps of key cities with information about them is also included. As in other Conan books new creatures and npc write ups are included. At the end of the book are ideas to help you run adventures set in teh Southlands of the world of Conan.
If you wanted to know more about the southlands and Conan adventures there then this is a book for you. In a 127 pages the book does a good job detailing that area and giving you help on creating a charcter from there.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
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