Pegasus Digital
Browse Categories











Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
You must be logged in to rate this
Coriolis: Aram's Ravine
by Marc C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/26/2018 13:54:27

« a complete scenario location for the award-winning Coriolis »

The use of the words «scenario location» was confusing to me. While their are descriptions of several locations, important NPCs and possible interactions between them and PCs, you will not find any detailed plans of buildings or an actual scenario/mission for the players. There are only two short paragraphs of possible adventures hooks at the end of the PDF. The GM has to do all the hard work. I didn't find what I was looking for but what is included is well written and engaging.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: Aram's Ravine
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Coriolis: The Dying Ship
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/15/2018 10:47:37

This adventure is a classic tale of a ship that has gone silent and off course, with the party sent to discover what's amiss, sort it out and recover a valuable cargo hauler and its load. The text begins with a detailed explanation of what has gone wrong and how it all came about, masses of beautiful detail that's enlightening for the GM but does raise the question of how easy it will be to enable the party to discover it all for themselves.

The adventure is well-resourced, with plenty of handouts and five pre-generated characters for groups who want to start straight away and have no characters of their own. Using your own characters is, however, a viable option. There are also some interesting comments about pacing the adventure, which can be done in a session or two if the group is time-strapped, or played out in a more leisurely manner for groups who like to explore every aspect of a given situation. Like any adventure, a thorough understanding and preparation on the part of the GM repays dividends. The situation is quite dangerous and should a player-character die, suggestions are made as to how best to replace them.

In classic style, the party is on Coriolis when they are approached and invited to a meeting at a cantina... and arrive to find another bunch impersonating them! Once this is sorted out - and several options are provided for you to use depending on how the party reacts - their contact will explain the delicate nature of the mission to be undertaken and enlist their help. He's in quite a rush to get their answer and be on the way... even going so far as to say he'll answer all the questions that they likely have once en route.

The trip to the oddly-behaving ship is relatively straightforward, although a few events are provided should you want to make a bit more of it. They may find out a bit more about the fellow who hired them as well. Once they arrive, the first trick is to get aboard. The hauler is already dangerously close to an asteroid swarm, which would probably destroy it if its course cannot be changed. The ship is dark, appears mostly powered-down, and the party's hails go unanswered. Once aboard, it is a creepy search to find the answers that they seek and regain control of the ship before it is all too late.

The exploration of the ship is handled in an elegant manner: it's completely up to the party what they do. The ship is described clearly, and certain things will occur in certain places... but only when the party reaches those places. Other events can be triggered as you feel appropriate. There's lots of atmospheric descriptions and ancillary notes making it all very easy to build up the air of suspense necessary... and of course that asteroid field is getting closer by the minute!

Overall it's an outstanding adventure, mixing traditional 'dead ship' tropes with some of the unique background and mythology of the Coriolis RPG (although if you are minded to get a bit mystical you could retool it for other spacefaring games). This has the potential to make a memorable story indeed.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: The Dying Ship
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Coriolis: Aram's Ravine
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/14/2018 10:30:43

This supplement introduces Aram's Ravine, the only settlement on a planet called Jina which is by all accounts a bit of a hellhole that you only want to visit if you are after bauxite and other minerals... or adventure, with rival individuals constantly bickering and intriguing against one another.

Jina is barely habitable, with acid storms, temperature extremes, dried-up oceans and icy poles. You are recommended to check out the comments on this planet in the core rulebook to put this settlement into context. The colony is a hub for everyone exploiting the resources of the planet. It's perched on the edge of a ravine in a place with odd geology that has led to the formation of several 'towers' of rock between which softer rock has been eroded away - and the settlement itself is located on several of the towers, linked by rather precarious-looking bridges.

There is a plan of the settlement, atmospherically presented in a way that represents the rather misty atmosphere. This mist is acidic and slowly eats away at anything and everything (including people!) left out in it. Locations of interest include a palatial bath house or hammam, cantinas, a chapel of the Icons, Colonial Agency office, a small medical facility and a witch doctor's office. Outside the settlement there's a local population of fiercely tribal xenophobic 'kalites', acid-resistant humanites who are fairly primitive, although probably less so than most people give them credit for. There's some description of the surrounding area, which is where the mines can be found.

Then we get to meet some of the personalities in the settlement. The Colonial Agent. The (self-proclaimed) Mine Lord. The Salt Witch. These are the three rivals, and there are other subsiduary NPCs as well.

Then there are a series of events, beginning with a note that any new arrivals - like the party - will immediately be drawn into the scheming and plotting that's going on whether they like it or not. And that's before any set=piece events take place. Both of the ideas presented are ripe for development into full-blown adventures, and are open-ended enough that you can put your own spin on them.

Another fascinating location replete with opportunity for adventure!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: Aram's Ravine
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Coriolis: The Mahanji Oasis
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/13/2018 09:40:23

Labau is an arid and hot desert planet, but if something takes the party there, they will be glad of a lush oasis to visit... so here it is. A few reasons for why they might be there are provided, and reading through the notes on Labau in the core rulebook may suggest others. The oasis and the lakes nearby are clearly visible from orbit.

There's an overview of the oasis and a more detailed description of the village of Mahanji and some of the notable places: a cantina, the caravan seraglio, and premises belonging to petroleum companies. There's also an area called the Wall of Dreams where you can find, er, individuals of negotiable affection. OK, that's where the brothels are. Apparently caravanners, petroleum workers and workers from the starport are all regular patrons.

There's a map of the area supplemented by a sort of labelled skectch of the village itself which gets across what's where in a very atmospheric way. There are notes on every location noted on the map and sketch. and some might think - if you don't mind the high temperatures - that it might be a nice place to establish a base...

Of course, then we hear about the simmering tensions between various groups. The Firstcomer natives aren't too happy about those prospecting for petroleum. There are rumours about illicit experiments going on in the Factory (which does bionics research). Something odd is going on around some ancient ruins... and now people have started to disappear. Things are coming to a head, and of course do so when the party is there, irrespective of why they have actually come! There are detailed notes on the main personalities involved (including stat blocks if required) and a series of events that will blow the lid off things. You could pile all of these up at once or - especially if you expect the party to be frequent visitors to the oasis - spread them out a bit, for each is capable of being developed into a full-blown adventure in its own right. This provides for a lot of flexibility, and the range of events means that you can pick which ones to develop based on what you know of the party or even which of the rumours flying around catches their interest!

A fascinating little settlement to visit in its own right, and with all this going on the party may be in for a long stay. Well worth a look!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: The Mahanji Oasis
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Coriolis: Hamurabi
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/12/2018 08:11:48

This supplement presents a location which can provide a resting place, a source of adventure or indeed be a place in which adventures take place: a portal station in the Hamura system. It orbits the system's star and is more or less equidistant between the two portals in the system. Being the only station in system, people using either portal are likely to visit. It boasts just over an hundred permanent residents, and has all the facilities you might need: cantina, souk, chapel, a medlab, and residential modules, some of which are available for rent by transients. There's also a 'coffin hostel' for those who cannot afford proper rooms for their stay.

The descriptions of the place bring plenty of local colour and atmosphere to help you bring it alive for the party. There's a general plan based on a labelled line drawing of a side elevation of the station and some illustrations as well. The station is directed by Akbar Rhavinn Bokor, who has offices and a fine residence. There's also a Colonial Office which deals with such matters as the registration of mining claims and ensuring that things intended for any colony end up at the right one... there's plenty of work hauling goods and information for those in need of a contract.

Next, the current situation is discussed. Various personalities come into play and there are several points of tension - such as ice miners from a nearby planet getting a bit rowdy on leave - that can serve as backdrop or even focus of adventures as desired. There are descriptions (and stat blocks, should you need them) for the major players in the various operations on the station and a few events that may occur as appropriate during the party's stay beginning with a 'welcoming committee' as soon as they dock. There's also a suggestion for a complete mini-adventure.

It all gives the impression of a bustling little haven of light out there in the black, a place that operates all the time whether or not the party are there. You'll need to provide extra detail to build events into full-blown encounters or to develop that mini-adventure but there's a sound framework on which to build. Definitely a place to visit, maybe the party will even make it a regular stopping-place in their travels.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: Hamurabi
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Coriols: Artifacts & Faction Tech
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/11/2018 11:28:33

Artefacts are the most valuable things that the party is likely to get its hands on, conferring great power or wealth in whoever's got them. There's some brief advice to the GM about where (and when) to make them available, and a note about the glyphs they are often covered with. A few are thought to be understood, but nobody's certain about what they mean, let alone being able to read them properly... perhaps there's a 'Rosetta Stone' out there to find?

Then comes a listing of artefacts ready for you to use. Each has a visual description (and often a picture) along with notes on what it can do, limitations or drawbacks... and what skills the party can use to figure it out. But that's not all. There are numerous sidebars that discuss various aspects of artefacts to further enhance your use of them in your game.

Unfortunately many artefacts do their stuff by manipulating energy streams that lie dangerously close to the Dark Between the Stars. For those that do, there's a note of how many Darkness Points are generated for the GM when it's used. If you are too bedazzled by the artefacts presented here to choose which of the over sixty presented here, there's a random selection table to roll on.

There are quite a few healing devices of various levels of power - most will be pretty scary for both the injured person and any bystanders when they are used, particularly if they haven't seen the particular artefact in action before. In fact, many of the artefacts have the potential to scare users...

The second part of the book covers Faction Technology. Unlike the mysterious artefacts, this is the cutting edge of contemporary development, often from hidden programmes of development that each faction desperately wants to hide from all its rivals. They're presented by faction with two or three signature items from each one. Often they reflect the faction's particular interests or strengths. Weapons and armour predominate, but there are ships and the intriguing proxy technology, an immersive alternate reality developed by Ahlam's Temple which they use sparingly for education or to allow experiences otherwise impossible - things like giving disabled individuals the use of the limbs or senses they cannot use in real life. Is this a blessing or a curse?

Providing a tantalising glimpse into both faction tech and the even stranger artefacts, these are items the average party should find only rarely, but when they do it's a reminder of how rich and strange the universe is. The one thing this work doesn't do is assign any values to anything listed here. Perhaps they are priceless. Or maybe it is up to the party to negotiate if they wish to part with the item in question. Maybe it's too dangerous to hawk them around... Whatever, they'll blow your mind. Sometimes literally.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Coriols: Artifacts & Faction Tech
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Symbaroum - Report 22:01:08
by aaron b. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/23/2018 12:29:58

i liked all of the tantalizing tidbits included in this...i cant wait until more expansive decriptions of those areas becomes available



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Symbaroum - Report 22:01:08
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Tales from the Loop: Our Friends the Machines & Other Mysteries
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/18/2018 15:11:13

http://www.teilzeithelden.de/2018/03/18/rezension-tales-from-the-loop-our-friends-the-machines-retroaktive-abenteuer/

Letztes Jahr hat Tales from the Loop die Herzen vieler 80er-Fans höher schlagen lassen. Die Spieler schlüpfen in die Rolle von Kindern und Jugendlichen, die in der kultigen Dekade fantastische Abenteuer erleben können. Bietet dieser Sammelband nun brauchbares neues Material oder kann man ihn links liegen lassen?

Im Dezember des vergangenen Jahres erschien mit Our Friends the Machines and other Mysteries die erste Abenteuersammlung für Tales from the Loop. In diesem Rollenspiel können die Spieler in die noch nicht ganz so ferne Vergangenheit der 1980er reisen und dort in die Haut von Kindern und Jugendlichen im Alter von 10 bis 15 Jahren schlüpfen. Wer also die Magie von Filmen wie Die Goonies, E.T. oder auch neuen Serien wie Stranger Things liebt, der sollte sich dieses System schnellstens zulegen, wie auch unser Spieltest belegt. Ein paar Abweichungen von den realen 80ern gibt es jedoch: An manchen Orten in Westeuropa und den USA befinden sich riesige unterirdische Teilchenbeschleuniger, umgangssprachlich Loops genannt, Magnetschwebelaster donnern über die Highways und die Robotik hat bereits beachtliche Fortschritte erzielt. Mit dieser Thematik steigt man auch in das namensgebende Szenario dieses Bandes ein.

Our Friends the Machines

Our Friends the Machines - Ein charmantes Szenario das sich gut in die Spielwelt einfügt Typisch für die 80er: Passend zu einer billig produzierten Zeichentrickserie, kommt eine neue Produktlinie von Actionfiguren auf den Markt. „Our Friends the Machines“ handelt von zwei verfeindeten Gruppen von Robotern, die sich, ähnlich wie die Transformers, in andere Maschinen verwandeln können. Die guten Convoys kämpfen für Gleichberechtigung, faire Bezahlung und Selbstbestimmung. Die bösen Deceivers wollen hingegen das Recht des Stärkeren durchsetzen und die Arbeiterklasse ausbeuten. Hinter den Figuren stehen als Ideengeber sozialistische Lokalpolitiker (wenn der Loop in Schweden oder England steht) oder ambitionierte Alt-Hippies (wenn das Szenario in die USA verlegt wird).

Dies könnte eine obskure Randnotiz der Spielzeuggeschichte bleiben, wenn sich nicht merkwürdige Vorkommnisse bei den Besitzern der Figuren häufen würden. Irgendwann kommen die Kids dahinter, dass etwas nicht stimmt und bemerken, dass die Figuren langsam ein Eigenleben entwickeln.

Insgesamt ist Our Friends the Machines ein sehr charmantes Szenario, dass eher an Small Soldiers denn an Transformers – gemeint sind die die Michael-Bay-Filme – erinnert und sich gerade deswegen gut in die, trotz aller Fantasie, bodenständige Welt von Tales from the Loop einfügt.

Horror Movie Mayhem

Horror Movie Mayhem - Maßnahmen zur moralischen Festigung der Jugend eher fragwürdiger Natur Dieses Szenario widmet sich der "moral panic", die in den 80ern vor allem in den USA grassiert. Horrorfilme, Heavy Metal und Fantasy-Rollenspiele seien allesamt Türöffner in eine Welt voller Perversionen, Mord, Satanismus und Drogenmissbrauch. Besorgte Eltern organisieren sich deswegen in Gruppen, die es sich zur Aufgabe machen, die moralischen Missstände im Keim zu ersticken.

Auch in der Heimat der Spielerfiguren organisiert sich in den Sommerferien eine solche Gruppe. Die Ereignisse spitzen sich zu, als demonstrierende Eltern die örtliche Videothek stürmen, um sie vom vermeintlichen Schund zu reinigen. Die Kids sind zufällig auch vor Ort und bekommen aufgrund des fanatischen Verhaltens der Erwachsenen und anderer Hinweise den Eindruck, dass mehr hinter der Sache steckt.

The Mummy in the Mist

The Mummy in the Mist - der Kunstgriff kindlichen Alltag einzubinden macht das sehr phantastische Szenario glaubwürdiger In diesem Szenario drückt seit einigen Tagen dichter Nebel auf die Stimmung im Heimatort der Kids. Als wäre dieses Wetterphänomen nicht genug, häufen sich auch die Berichte, dass sich eine Mumie am Ufer des nahen Sees herumtreibt. Oder hat das etwas mit den Patrouillen von Loop-Mitarbeitern zu tun, die zunehmend in der Umgebung zu sehen sind? Die Charaktere kommen nach und nach einem verschachtelten Geheimnis auf die Spur und erfahren, wie alles zusammenhängt.

The Mummy in the Mist nimmt sich Zeit, die Spieler langsam zur eigentlichen Story hinzuführen. Als einziges Szenario in diesem Band bindet es den schulischen Alltag der Spielercharaktere ein und wird dadurch unterhaltsamer und glaubwürdiger.

Mixtape of Mysteries

Mixtape of Mysteries - Angelehnt an populären Songs aus den 80ern werden kleine aber feine Szenarien ausgebreitet Auf diesem verschriftlichen Mixtape befinden sich acht bekannte Songs aus den 80ern. Hinter jedem Songtitel verbirgt sich ein kleiner aber feiner Szenario-Aufhänger. Auf die einzelnen Ideen möchte ich an dieser Stelle nicht ausführlich eingehen, mich ihnen aber trotzdem kurz widmen.

Während "Sweet Dreams" von den Eurythmics von der Grundidee an die ersten beiden Szenarien dieses Bands erinnert, besticht "Every Breath You Take" von The Police mit einer düsteren Story über aggressive Jugendliche, die gänzlich ohne fantastische Elemente auskommt. "Girls Just Wanna Have Fun" von Cyndi Lauper widmet sich der Anziehungskraft einer satanischen Gruppe, "Where Is My Mind" von den Pixies einem Psychiater mit ungewöhnlichen Behandlungsmethoden.

Die B-Seite startet mit "Nightrain" von Guns n' Roses und einem musikalisch begabten Landstreicher, gefolgt von meinem persönlichen Highlight, nämlich Alphavilles "Forever Young", das sich auf die Schulzeit der Charaktere und einige neue Schüler konzentriert. "Thriller" von Michael Jackson ist sicherlich der übernatürlichste Song auf diesem Tape, wirkt aber etwas unfertig und konstruiert. "Heaven Is A Place On Earth" von Belinda Carlisle rundet das Tape schließlich mit einer verschlossenen Freikirche ab, die sich in der Nähe des Heimatorts der Spielercharaktere niederlässt.

Insgesamt bietet das Mixtape eine Menge interessantes Spielmaterial. Bei fast jedem Szenario kann ich mir vorstellen, es einmal auszuprobieren. Lediglich "Thriller" wirkt, trotz seiner spannenden Ausgangssituation, etwas abstrus, was aber auch an einem Formfehler liegen kann. Denn die Einstiegsmöglichkeiten werden am Ende noch einmal mit anderen Worten wiedergegeben, wohingegen Impulse zur weiteren Entwicklung oder Auflösung des Szenarios, die sonst an dieser Stelle stehen, völlig fehlen.

 Wer nach all diesen Szenarien immer noch Spielmaterial braucht, kann sich gerne das kleine aber feine Szenario anschauen, das unser Redakteur Felix geschrieben hat.

Hometown Hack Gelungen ist auch die kleine Anleitung, um seine eigene Loop-Location zu basteln. Solltet ihr aus einer Kleinstadt mit höchstens ein paar tausend Einwohnern stammen, erfahrt ihr in einem Kapitel, wie ihr eure Heimat in die Welt von Tales from the Loop übertragen könnt. Als anschauliches Beispiel dienen die englischen Norfolk Broads, in denen einige Modiphius-Mitarbeiter aufgewachsen sind. Die Gegend in East Anglia bekommt in Our Friends the Machines eine – sehr knappe – Beschreibung und eine hübsche Karte spendiert. Großstadtkinder, wie der Autor dieser Zeilen, können mit etwas Fantasie auch ihren heimatlichen Stadtteil einbetten, oder müssen sich beim Wohnort der ländlichen Verwandtschaft bedienen.

Erscheinungsbild Das Artwork von Simon Stålenhag ist – das muss man an dieser Stelle einfach sagen – wunderschön. Leider passt es so gut wie nie zum Inhalt der Szenarien. Der Fokus liegt ganz klar auf den Maschinen und Robotern, die Tales from the Loop von den realen 80ern abheben. Dadurch sind sie im Artwork präsenter als in den Abenteuern und der landläufigen Vorstellung von den 80ern. Ein paar mehr Bilder von alltäglichen Situationen, vor allem mit den spielbaren Kids, wären hier sinnvoller gewesen.

Die schwarzweißen Charakterporträts stammen von Reine Rosenberg und stellen die zahlreichen Nebenfiguren stimmig dar. Ausfälle sind nur selten zu verzeichnen. Dank ihres rahmenlosen Designs fügen sie sich gut in das restliche Layout ein. Insgesamt ist der Band sauber durchstrukturiert und sehr übersichtlich. 

Fazit Der erste Abenteuerband für Tales from the Loop ist ein bunter Strauß schöner Abenteuerideen, der nur selten ins dröge Mittelmaß abstürzt. Wer mag, kann mit dieser Kompilation ganze Jahre in der aufregenden Dekade der 80er füllen. Schön ist, dass in manche Szenarien auch der Schulalltag mit all seinen Höhen und Tiefen eingebunden wird. Manchmal wirkt der Einstieg in die Szenarien jedoch etwas erzwungen. In diesem Punkt haben die Autoren wohl oft darauf gebaut, dass die reine Neugier der Kids diese tiefer ins Mysterium treibt. Insgesamt hat jedes Szenario mindestens eine kleine Macke, aber fast alle fangen auf charmante Art und Weise das gewünschte kindlich-abenteuerliche Ambiente der 80er ein – oder zumindest die Klischees, die wir damit verbinden. Wer bereits Fan von Tales from the Loop ist, sollte sich diesen Band zulegen, falls er ihn nicht ohnehin schon unterm Weihnachtsbaum liegen hatte.

Artikelbilder: © SIMON STÅLENHAG AND FRIA LIGAN AB Dieses Produkt wurde kostenlos als PDF zur Verfügung gestellt.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Tales from the Loop: Our Friends the Machines & Other Mysteries
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Tales from the Loop RPG: Rulebook
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/20/2018 03:09:26

http://www.teilzeithelden.de/2018/02/20/spieltest-tales-from-the-loop-abenteuer-in-den-80ern/

Tales from the Loop war im vergangenen Jahr eine kleine Überraschung im Rollenspielbereich. Das Setting sind die 1980er und die Charaktere Heranwachsende in jener Dekade. Abenteuer im Stile von E.T. und Stranger Things locken also. Grund genug für eine unerschrockene Gruppe Teilzeithelden, das System am Spieltisch zu testen.

Tales from the Loop spielt in den 1980ern – die es aber so nie in der Wirklichkeit gegeben hat. Riesige Frachttransporter gleiten auf Magnetströmen durch die Landschaft und intelligente Roboter gehen den Menschen bei ihren alltäglichen Arbeiten zur Hand. Zudem existieren überall auf der Welt geheime Forschungseinrichtungen, in denen an weiteren spektakulären Erfindungen gearbeitet wird. Zwei davon befinden sich am Mälarsee in der Nähe von Stockholm und bei Boulder City, einer Kleinstadt vor den Toren von Las Vegas und am Fuße des Hoover-Staudamms gelegen. Diese Einrichtungen werden umgangssprachlich Loop genannt, da es sich bei ihnen um hochmoderne Teilchenbeschleuniger handelt, deren kreisrunde Röhren sich meilenweit unter der Erde erstrecken. Über der Erde, im Schatten des Reaktors, der den Loop mit Energie versorgt, leben die Menschen ahnungslos, ebenso wie die Spielercharaktere.

Spielwelt, Regeln und Charaktererschaffung Bei den Spielercharakteren in Tales from the Loop handelt es sich um Kinder im Alter von 10-15 Jahren. Zielgruppe sind natürlich jene großen Kinder, die gerne in die Welt der 1980er eintauchen wollen. Die Regeln sind sehr übersichtlich und setzen den Fokus eher auf erzählerische Freiheiten, weswegen ich hier auch nicht im Details auf die Regeln eingehen möchte. Der Star dieses Regelwerks ist die Spielwelt.

Anhand der Erschaffung der Charaktere lassen sich aber natürlich einige Regeln darstellen. Hier ist die illustre Runde, die sich neben dem Spielleiter am virtuellen Spieltisch einfand:

Roger wählte als Charakter den Hick, der ein bisschen länger zur Schule braucht, da er weiter außerhalb wohnt. Dafür kann er aber bereits einen Traktor lenken und einen Motor reparieren. Nathan, kurz Naddy, leidet jedoch unter einem unangenehmen Problem, einer leichten Form des Tourette-Syndroms, was sich darin äußert, dass er in Stresssituationen zu grunzen anfängt.

Annika spielte Lilly, das Popular Kid, bei jedermann beliebt, allerdings gestraft mit einem zerstrittenen Elternpaar. Sie wünscht sich, später einmal als Journalistin zu arbeiten, deshalb ist sie zur Chefin der Schülerzeitung geworden. Ihre Neugier bringt sie aber auch oft in Probleme. Immer mit dabei: ihre treue Kamera.

Felix stellte Bobby dar, den sportbegeisterten Jock und Sohn eines strengen Polizisten. Zwar hat er Spaß an seiner Funktion als Linebacker der Junior-High-Footballmannschaft, steht aber immer im Schatten seines älteren Bruders, der Quarterback an der Senior-High ist.

Kathrin spielte Dee, die rebellische Rockerin, deren Leidenschaft laute Musik ist, woraus die meisten Erwaschsenen ableiten, dass sie ihre Seele bereits dem Satan verkauft hat. Von der Kleinstadt und ihren spießigen Eltern genervt, hängt sie lieber im Plattenladen ab.

Beim Bookworm spricht der Name für sich. Ein Nerd alter Schule, der in seiner Freizeit gerne in alten Büchern wälzt. So funktioniert auch Norberts Charakter Octavian, der nach dem mysteriösen Tod seines Vaters einen väterlichen Freund im Bibliothekar der Schule gefunden hat.

Der Computer Geek ist ähnlich getaktet, verbringt seine Zeit aber lieber vor dem Bildschirm und interessiert sich für Technik. Der rebellische Troublemaker hat für Bildung hingegen nur wenig übrig und löst seine Probleme lieber mit Gewalt. Der Weirdo schließlich ist der etwas seltsame Mitschüler, der zum Beispiel mit blau gefärbten Haaren zur Schule kommt oder ein merkwürdiges Hobby wie Taxidermie hat. Diese drei Charaktertypen wurden allerdings nicht gewählt.

Nach der Wahl des Charakters verteilt jeder Spieler Punkte auf vier Attribute (Die Punktzahl entspricht dem Alter des Charakters, allerdings sinkt mit jedem Lebensjahr die Anzahl der Glückspunkte) und zwölf Fertigkeiten (Jeder Charaktertyp hat drei Kernfertigkeiten, die ein bischen höher gesteigert werden dürfen). Addiert man den Attributswert und den Fertigkeitswert, ergibt sich ein Würfelpool.

Dann wählt jeder Spieler noch einige persönliche Merkmale, die auch regeltechnische Auswirkungen haben können: was ihn antreibt (zum Beispiel Lillys Neugier), worauf er stolz ist (Dee beugt sich keiner Autorität), was ihm Probleme bereitet (Naddys Krankheit), einen besonderen Gegenstand in seinem Besitz (Bobbys Footballhelm) und schließlich einen Anchor – eine Nichtspielerfigur, die als emotionaler Anker fungiert und den Spielercharakter in Form einer ausgespielten Szene von Negativzuständen heilen kann (zum Beispiel Octavians Freund, der Schulbibliothekar). Denn sterben können die Spielercharaktere bei Tales from the Loop nicht. Sie können nur handlungsunfähig werden, wenn sie zu viele Negativzustände ansammeln.

Soweit zu den Regeln, nun zum Abenteuer am Spieltisch!

Spielbericht Die kleinstädtische Ruhe von Boulder City endete für Octavian, als er in der Nacht auf den 18.12.1987, dem letzten Freitag vor den Weihnachtsferien, zwei Männer in schwarzen Ledermänteln bemerkte, die in das Haus seines alten und zurückgezogen lebenden Nachbarn Mr. Vitelli eindrangen. Zudem konnte er kurz darauf beobachten, wie ein weiterer Mann, dieser mit gezogener Pistole, auf das Haus zugerannt kam. Nachdem Octavian telefonisch die Polizei verständigt hatte, konnte er nur noch mitbekommen, wie ein Auto mit quietschenden Reifen davonfuhr.

Mr. Vitelli, so erfuhr Octavian in den frühen Morgenstunden von Polizisten, die den Tatort sicherten, war ermordet worden. Außerdem tauchte dort ein Mann namens Palmer auf, der sich als FBI-Agent vorstellte und die Ermittlungen übernahm. Wie Octavian mitbekam, sei er sich sehr sicher, dass es sich um einen satanistischen Ritualmord handle, und es gebe bereits einen Verdächtigen. Zu Octavians Überraschung handelte es sich bei Palmer um jenen dritten Mann, den er wenige Stunden zuvor am Tatort gesehen hatte. Das behielt er aber zunächst für sich. Schließlich wurde es auch Zeit für die Schule, zu der er von seiner nervigen Schwester gefahren wurde. Damit musste sich auch Bobby begnügen, dessen Vater zum Tatort gerufen worden war und seinen Sohn bei Octavian abgesetzt hatte. Die anderen Kinder hingegen erlebten zunächst einen ganz gewöhnlichen Morgen: Naddy trottete zum Schulbus, Lilly ließ einen Streit zwischen ihren Eltern über sich ergehen und Dee bekam von ihrer Mutter einen Flyer in die Hand gedrückt, von welcher schädlichen Musik sie sich fernzuhalten habe.

Vor dem Schulgebäude trafen sich die Kinder schließlich, und Octavian erzählte ihnen allen, was er in der Nacht erlebt hatte. Vor allem Lilly kam die Sache seltsam vor, und sie witterte eine Verschwörung, weswegen sie ein gemeinsames Treffen nach der Schule vorschlug.

Doch bereits während der Schulzeit konnten einige Kinder mitbekommen, dass Polizeibeamte ein Phantombild an ihre Lehrer verteilten. Sowohl Lilly als auch Naddy wollten mehr darüber herausfinden. Beide versuchten es mit ihrem Charme, doch überraschenderweise schaffte es der grobschrötige Naddy mit der Androhung eines Grunzanfalls, und konnte von einem Lehrer eines der Phantombilder zu erhalten, während Lilly von ihrer Lehrerin einen ordentlichen Rüffel bekam und danach den Tränen nahe war und den Negativzustand Upset erhielt.

Da es sich laut Begleittext zum Phantombild um einen ehemaligen Schüler handeln soll, der erst vor wenigen Jahren seinen Abschluss gemacht haben soll, kamen die Spieler kamen auf die Idee, in alten Jahrbüchern nach einem passenden Treffer zu suchen. Tatsächlich gelang dies dank Octavians Fähigkeiten als Bücherwurm relativ schnell. Das Phantombild entsprach auch genau dem Foto im Jahrbuch, so als wäre es abgezeichnet. Dee bemerkte, dass es sich um einen Bekannten des Plattenladenangestellten Danny handelte.

Die Kids teilten sich schließlich auf. Dee wollte zum Plattenladen gehen, um Danny, der auch ihr Anchor ist, zu informieren, dass sein Kumpel von der Polizei gesucht wird. Bobby wollte sie natürlich begleiten, um sie vor dem satanistischen Serienkiller zu beschützen, falls dieser anwesend sein sollte. Danny erzählte den beiden, dass sein Kumpel gerade mit seiner Band unterwegs gewesen sei, also ein Alibi zu haben schien.

Wieder vereint in Octavians Zimmer und mit Sicht auf Mr. Vitellis Haus wurde ein Plan ausgeheckt, um den Tatort näher zu untersuchen, und schließlich in die Tat umgesetzt. Naddy, verborgen in einem Baum auf der anderen Straßenseite, lenkte einen Wachroboter der Polizei mit Schüssen aus seiner selbstgebastelten Schleuder ab, während Bobby unter dem Baum Schmiere stand. Dee, Lilly und Octavian drangen derweil durch die Hintertür in Mr. Vitellis Haus ein. Sie fanden dort einige Hinweise, die tatsächlich auf einen Ritualmord hindeuteten, wie zum Beispiel ein Pentagramm an der Wand, das offenbar mit dem Blut des Opfers gemalt worden war.

Schließlich wagten sich die drei nach unten in den Keller und konnten dort neben einigem Gerümpel eine Geheimtür finden. Just in diesem Moment überschlugen sich die Ereignisse. Zwei Männer in langen schwarzen Ledermänteln erschienen vor dem Haus und bewegten sich ebenfalls zur Hintertür. Mit dem Roboter machten sie kurzen Prozess, wurden daraufhin aber von Bobby überrumpelt, der sich versteckt hatte. Beide Schurken tackelte Bobby mit Bravour um, wobei ihm sein Footballhelm als persönliches Iconic Item einen Bonus brachte.

Die drei Charaktere im Haus konnten in der Zwischenzeit den geheimen Raum im Keller durchsuchen und dabei Unterlagen finden, die enthüllten, dass Mr. Vitelli eigentlich Piero Bondoni hieß, früher Physiker im faschistischen Italien gewesen war und danach bis 1963 im Loop an Teleportationstechnologie geforscht hatte. Naddy konnte währendessen draußen den vermeintlichen FBI-Agenten Palmer sehen, der sich ebenfalls ums Haus herum zur Hintertür begab. Mit der Schleuder überraschte er Palmer, der jedoch nur belustigt die Hände hochnahm. Als er Bobby und die beiden überrumpelten Männer sah, beglückwünschte er die beiden Jungs, dass sie etwas Gutes getan hätten, riet ihnen aber auch, schleunigst von diesem Ort zu verschwinden.

Die Lage spitzte sich jedoch zu, als die anderen drei Kids mit den Unterlagen aus Vitellis Keller nach oben kamen. Palmer verlangte die Herausgabe der Akten und drohte ihnen, wurde aber schließlich von Dee abgelenkt, bekam von Lilly eins mit einer Pfanne übergebraten, wurde von Octavian mit Mehl beworfen und schließlich von Bobby umgetackelt. Da heulten aber bereits die Polizeisirenen in der Nähe auf. In dem ganzen Trubel konnte Octavian nur eine einzige Akte mitnehmen, schaffte es aber, mit Naddy und Lilly zu fliehen. Bobby lenkte derweil die Polizei ab – ausgerechnet sein Vater war natürlich dabei –, ab, indem er die ganze Verantwortung auf sich nahm und behauptete, er hätte Dee den Tatort zeigen wollen, um diese zu beeindrucken. Die beiden Männer in den schwarzen Ledermänteln hätten sie angegriffen und auch den FBI-Agenten umgehauen. Zu Bobbys Überraschung und Erleichterung, bestätigte Palmer die Geschichte, weswegen es für die Kinder keine Konsequenzen gab. Ganz im Gegenteil wurde Bobby sogar gelobt, weil er Palmer geholfen habe, die beiden Mörder auszuschalten, die offenbar zum Tatort zurückgekehrt waren.

Was genau hinter der ganzen Geschichte steckte, konnten die Kinder nicht herausfinden, aber so sollte es auch sein. Denn schließlich lässt jeder gute Trip in die 80er auch einige offene Enden für die Fortsetzung über, was sogar im Regelwerk angeregt wird.

Spielbarkeit aus Spielleitersicht Erst einmal zu den unbestreitbaren Vorteilen: Dank der überschaubaren Regeln muss nicht viel nachgeschlagen werden, und der Spielleiter kann sich voll und ganz auf das erzählerische Element konzentrieren. Denn jeder Würfelwurf sollte gemeinsam mit den Spielern erzählerisch begleitet werden. So wünscht es das Regelwerk – und so macht es auch am meisten Spaß.

Wer als Spielleiter gerne detaillierte Abenteuer ausarbeitet und den Spielern eine ausgefeilte, aber letztlich vorgefertigte Geschichte präsentieren möchte, der wird mit Tales from the Loop eher keine Freude haben. Die Spieler dürfen sich nämlich frei bewegen und können sich kindgerecht austoben. Dass sie sich so intensiv mit ihrer Schule und den Lehrern beschäftigen möchten, hatte ich im Vorfeld zum Beispiel nicht geplant. Auch sonst haben sie oft das vorbereitete Territorium verlassen, zum Beispiel bei der Episode mit dem Phantombild. Improvisationstalent ist hier also insbesondere von Vorteil.

Spielbarkeit aus Spielersicht

Tales from the Loop zu spielen, ist eine ungewöhnliche, aber lohnenswerte Erfahrung. Zu Beginn kann es etwas gewöhnungsbedürftig sein, ein Kind zu verkörpern, und auch auf die Technologie der 80er Jahre muss man sich bewusst einstellen. Glücklicherweise fällt das Regelwerk sehr unkompliziert aus, sodass die nötigen Kapazitäten für die Beschäftigung mit dem Hintergrund frei bleiben.

Die grundlegenden Mechanismen sind innerhalb von Minuten erklärt und nach den ersten Proben verinnerlicht. Wer noch keine Erfahrungen mit narrativ geprägten Systemen gesammelt hat, wundert sich eventuell über die Funktionsweise einiger Skills, aber das sind auch schon die einzigen Unklarheiten, die aufkommen könnten.

Die Freunde freier Charaktererschaffung müssen allerdings Einschränkungen hinnehmen. Die Kinder, die gespielt werden, entsprechen klar archetypischen Schablonen, die nur an den Rändern individualisiert werden können. Tatsächlich hilft aber gerade diese klischeehafte Präsentation dabei, das Feeling klassischer 80er-Abenteuerfilme zu erzeugen.

Und dieses Feeling macht nun mal den Reiz des Spiels aus. Tales from the Loop ist nichts für Spieler, die der Dekade des Atari und der BMX-Räder nichts abgewinnen können. Wer hingegen E.T., Die Goonies und Stranger Things mochte, wird sich in der Spielwelt sofort heimisch fühlen. Das ganze Setting atmet den Geist eines ikonischen Jahrzehnts und bietet gleichzeitig die Möglichkeit, jede Menge Unerwartetes zu entdecken.

Fazit Wir fassen zusammen: Wer Tales from the Loop spielt, sollte sich zunächst einmal mit der Spielwelt anfreunden können, denn diese ist das Kernstück des Systems. Wer absolut keine Lust auf ein Abenteuer als Heranwachsender in den 1980ern hat, der wird sich diesem System wahrscheinlich ohnehin nicht ohne Zwang nähern.

Tales from the Loop nutzt die Klischees, die in unzähligen Filmen und Serien kultiviert wurden, um gleichzeitig vertraute wie auch fantastische Szenen darzustellen. In diese Richtung dürfen sich die Spieler entsprechend des Alters ihrer Figuren austoben und ihre eigenen Vorstellungen von dieser Zeit oder auch eigene Erinnerungen daran in das Spiel einfließen lassen.

Für erwachsene Menschen kann es aber auch zur Herausforderung werden, sich auf die Rolle als Kind einzulassen. Manch ein Spieler ist einfach zu abgeklärt und fühlt sich in einem Szenario, in dem Erfahrungen und Handlungsmöglichkeiten nur begrenzt vorhanden sind, wahrscheinlich etwas unwohl. Zumal die eng gestrickten Archetypen etwas einschränkend wirken können und nur wenig Raum für Charakterentwicklung bieten.

Aber genau das ist auch die Stärke von Tales from the Loop. Es ist ein erzählerisches Rollenspielsystem, in dem jeder Spieler in der von ihm gewählten Rolle vollkommen aufblühen kann. Zudem punktet das System mit einem schlanken Regelwerk, das sich gut in die Spielwelt einfügt.

Es ist zwar fraglich, wie lange der Spaß am Spiel anhält, wenn einem die Klischees irgendwann langweilig werden, aber wenn jemand zugreift, weil er gerade diese Klischees so liebt, dann dürfte das sehr lange dauern.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Tales from the Loop RPG: Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Coriolis: The Dying Ship
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/27/2018 06:43:05

http://www.teilzeithelden.de/2018/01/27/rezension-coriolis-the-dying-ship-die-erste-mission/

Vor gut einem Jahr erschien Coriolis auf dem Rollenspielmarkt und machte mit seinem orientalisch angehauchten SciFi-Setting sowie seinem schlanken Regelwerk einen sehr guten Eindruck. Mit The Dying Ship ist inzwischen das erste Abenteuer erschienen. Taugt es zum Einstieg? Erfahrt es im Artikel und kommt mit in den Dritten Horizont!

Coriolis wagt den Spagat zwischen mystischer Vergangenheit und ferner Zukunft. Das Hintergrundsetting ist der Dritte Horizont, eine durch Sprungportale verbundene Ansammlung von Sternensystemen, die vor Jahrhunderten von mutigen Menschen besiedelt wurde. Eine eigene Kultur entwickelte sich, die an den irdischen Orient erinnern soll und mit Referenzen an Tausendundeine Nacht gespickt ist. Nach einem verheerenden Krieg mit den Reichen des Zweiten Horizonts und dem Imperium des Ersten Horizonts, in dem sich Al-Ardha, die sagenumwobene Wiege der Menschheit, befinden soll, versank der Dritte Horizont in friedvoller, aber auch trostloser Dunkelheit.

Die Menschen erzählten sich mit gedämpfter Stimme, dass Dschinne zwischen den Sternen auf arglose Reisende lauern und nur fromme Gebete in Richtung der Neun Ikonen vor dem drohenden Chaos schützen würden. Dann tauchte die Zenith auf, vor Jahrhunderten von Al-Ardha aus aufgebrochen, um ohne die damals unbekannten Sprungportale das All zu besiedeln. Die Tatkraft der Zenithianer brachte Bewegung in den Dritten Horizont: Sie bauten ihr gigantisches Schiff in eine Raumstation um und machten sie zum gesellschaftlichen Zentrum aller Fraktionen. The Dying Ship ist nach einigen Einstiegsabenteuern im Grundregelwerk und den Schnellstartregeln die erste Möglichkeit, den Dritten Horizont – oder zumindest einen Ausschnitt davon – als Spieler kennenzulernen.

Inhalt Das Abenteuer beginnt stilgerecht auf der namensgebenden Raumstation Coriolis. Da in dem Regelwerk vorausgesetzt wird, dass die Spielercharaktere die Crew eines Raumschiffs bilden, ist dies auch im Abenteuer die Ausgangslage. Die Raumfahrer suchen Arbeit und bekommen einen lukrativen Bergungsauftrag versprochen. Details gibt es im Spielerkasten:

[spoiler]Die Raumfahrer sollen einen verschollenen Eistransporter ausfindig machen. Direkt zum Einstieg gibt es eine charmante Szene zu überstehen: Beim Auftraggeber nämlich, der in einer Bar wartet, hockt bereits eine andere Gruppe, die sich als die Spielercharaktere ausgibt, um ihnen den Job wegzuschnappen. Das Warum bleibt zunächst unklar, aber dem erfahrenen Abenteurer sollte da bereits dämmern, dass mehr hinter dem Auftrag steckt, als es zunächst den Anschein hat.

Und tatsächlich: Der Eistransporter wurde von einigen Crew-Mitgliedern zum Schmuggeln missbraucht und die Söldner, die sich anfangs den Job hatten erschleichen wollen, arbeiten für das Verbrechersyndikat, das diese geheime Ladung gerne wieder zurück hätte. Auch der Auftraggeber ist nicht der einfache Konzernangestellte, der er zu sein vorgibt: Bei ihm handelt es sich um einen Exorzisten. Kurz bevor der Eistransporter verloren ging, konnte er noch in einem Notruf mitteilen, dass sich ein Dschinn aus dem Eis befreit hatte, welches das Schiff transportierte. Der Exorzist soll deswegen eine Crew anheuern und den Dschinn diskret beseitigen.

Ja, Dschinne gibt es wirklich und einer davon hat vor Jahrhunderten die Kontrolle über eine raumfahrende Prinzessin (ja, auch die gibt es wirklich in Coriolis!) und ihr Gefolge übernommen. Inzwischen ist auch ein Teil der Schiffscrew unter die Kontrolle des Dschinns geraten, während andere noch um ihr Überleben kämpfen. Kurzum: Die Charaktere gelangen ins Innere des Schiffs und geraten zwischen den Dschinn und seine Diener, schießwütige, aber unter Umständen hilfreiche Überlebende und schließlich die Söldner, die immer noch hinter der Schmuggelware her sind.[/spoiler]

Der Ausgang des Abenteuers ist sehr offen gestaltet. Nach einem Kapitel zur Einführung werden im zweiten Kapitel die Örtlichkeiten und die dort möglichen Ereignisse vorgestellt. Kapitel Drei ist schließlich eine Zusammenfassung verschiedener möglicher Enden.

Ohne zu viel vorwegzunehmen möchte ich an dieser Stelle anmerken, dass das Abenteuer vom Aufbau und Inhalt her sehr stark an das Abenteuer aus den Schnellstartregeln erinnert. Die Unterschiede sind eher kosmetischer Natur und das Abenteuer kann sich in ähnliche Richtungen entwickeln. Wem also das Abenteuer aus den Schnellstartregeln von seinem Aufbau und seiner Machart her nicht zusagt, der sollte besser auch die Finger von The Dying Ship lassen. 

Es sind übrigens auch fünf Archetypen enthalten, die mit denen aus den Schnellstartregeln identisch sind.

Erscheinungsbild Coriolis, das muss man sagen, hat insgesamt qualitativ hochwertige Illustrationen. Man muss aber auch anmerken, dass diese Illustrationen austauschbar wirken. Das Titelbild ist da ein gutes Beispiel, so ein richtig spezielles Coriolis-Feeling hat sich bei mir bisher nicht eingestellt. Das kann aber auch daran liegen, dass es bei mir persönlich noch nicht geklickt hat. Immerhin, in The Dying Ship sind endlich mal richtig viele Bilder zu Nichtspielercharakteren abgebildet, durch die man einen guten Eindruck bekommt, was einen im Dritten Horizont so erwartet.

Was Layout und Struktur angeht, gibt es hier fast nichts zu meckern. Auch der schlichte Plan zum titelgebenden Schiff weiß zu gefallen.

Fazit Das Abenteuer beinhaltet einige nette Momente und kann bequem an einem Abend durchgespielt werden. Es ist übersichtlich und bietet zugleich einiges an Handlungsfreiheit. Der Spielleiter muss dementsprechend etwas mehr vorbereiten als bei anderen Kaufabenteuern üblich, beziehungsweise muss er spontan auf die Handlungen der Spieler reagieren können. Etwas unglücklich ist, dass das Abenteuer aus den Schnellstartregeln beinahe identisch aufgebaut ist.

Zwar bietet The Dying Ship mehr Details und natürlich eine andere Hintergrundgeschichte, aber gerade bei einer Einsteigergruppe, die nach dem Abenteuer aus den Schnellstartregeln direkt weiterspielen möchte und dann The Dying Ship beginnt, dürfte sich Ernüchterung breitmachen, wenn sie auf einen ähnlichen Plot stoßen. Ansonsten macht das Abenteuer einen durchaus guten Eindruck und besticht durch seinen relativ offenen Plot.

Artikelbilder: Modiphius Dieses Produkt wurde kostenlos als digitale Kopie zur Verfügung gestellt.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: The Dying Ship
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Symbaroum - Core Rulebook
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/20/2018 08:25:26

Very interesting setting and system, we all look forward to running it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Symbaroum - Core Rulebook
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Symbaroum - Core Rulebook
by Norbert P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/09/2018 13:30:58

Check out my youtube review of Symbaroum...

Symbaroum rpg: https://youtu.be/KB4cWq2zkyw



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: Supplements Bundle
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 12/19/2017 03:53:04

Dass der Dritte Horizont voller Abenteuer steckt, war bereits nach Lektüre des Grundregelwerks von Coriolis Mit dem Supplement-Bundle wird nun noch etwas Inhalt nachgeliefert: ein paar Regeln, Ortsbeschreibungen und frische Abenteuerideen – das kann doch gar nicht so schlecht sein, oder?

Das Grundregelwerk und das Atlas Compendium boten eine solide Grundlage für turbulente Abenteuer im Dritten Horizont, der Welt von Coriolis. Um der Welt aber noch etwas mehr Tiefe zu verleihen, wurde kurz nach Veröffentlichung ein Supplement-Bundle nachgereicht, um das es in diesem Kurzcheck gehen soll.

Inhalt Das Supplement-Bundle enthält vier PDF-Dateien, die zwischen zwölf und neunzehn Seiten lang sind. Drei davon beschreiben je einen besonderen Ort im Dritten Horizont, den die Spielercharaktere erkunden können.

Dabei handelt es sich zum einen um die Mahanji-Oase, die auf dem Wüstenplaneten Lubau liegt und dort einen Treffpunkt für Kaufleute, Prospektoren und einheimische Nomaden darstellt. Der Planet Lubau ist reich an Ressourcen, weswegen mehrere Fraktionen in der Oase Fuß fassen möchten, wodurch die Situation angespannt ist.

Zum anderen wird die Hamurabi Portal-Station beschrieben, einer von zahlreichen Rastplätzen, der sich in der Nähe der Sternenportale befindet, welche die Sternensysteme des Dritten Horizonts miteinander verbinden. Hamurabi ist jedoch eine ziemlich belebte Portal-Station, da sie in der Nähe von gleich zwei Portalen liegt. Dementsprechend beliebt ist der Ort als Treffpunkt von Diplomaten und Händlern, wodurch viele undurchsichtige Intrigen Hamurabi zu einem gefährlichen Pflaster machen.

Zu guter Letzt wird Arams Schlucht beschrieben, die einzige Kolonie auf dem lebensfeindlichen Planeten Jina. Hier werden unter erbarmungswürdigen Bedingungen Mineralien abgebaut und die verfeindeten Minenbesitzer kämpfen hinter den Kulissen erbittert um jeden Schacht.

Alle drei Schauplätze werden sehr lebendig beschrieben und haben auch sofort einige Abenteuerideen und Nichtspielercharaktere im Gepäck. Mit etwas Vorarbeit kann der Spielleiter in kurzer Zeit kleine oder große Abenteuer im Dritten Horizont kreieren.

Zusätzlich gibt es noch eine PDF, die sich mit Artefakten bei Coriolis beschäftigen. Dabei geht es nicht nur um regeltechnische Eigenschaften und schnöde Tabellen, sondern vor allem um Hintergrundbeschreibungen zu besonderen Stücken und zum Umgang der verschiedenen Fraktionen im Dritten Horizont mit Artefakten.

Erscheinungsbild Die Illustrationen zu den drei Orten wissen zu überzeugen. Teilweise schaffen sie es, die Stimmung der Lokalität noch ein bisschen besser einzufangen, als es im Atlas Compendium gelungen ist. Dort wirkten die Illustrationen noch etwas beliebig und konnten nicht immer ganz mit dem beschriebenen Ort in Verbindung gebracht werden – das klappt bei diesen zugespitzten kleinen Spielhilfen anscheinend besser. Gut gelungen ist auch das übersichtliche Kartenmaterial.

Fazit Das Supplement-Bundle eignet sich sehr gut für Spielleiter, die nach der Lektüre von Regelbuch und Atlas ihre Runde ein bisschen tiefer in den Dritten Horizont eintauchen lassen wollen. Die in den drei Ortsbeschreibungen enthaltenen Abenteuerideen sind zwar recht simpel und nicht sonderlich innovativ, aber wahrscheinlich passend für Einsteiger, die eine neue Spielwelt erkunden wollen. Obendrauf gibt es noch eine kleine Spielhilfe zu Artefakten, die das Grundregelwerk ergänzt.

Bei dem relativ niedrigen Preis können Fans und Spieler von Coriolis also bedenkenlos zugreifen, sollten aber keine vollständige Mahlzeit erwarten – hier gibt es nur die Beilagen zu kaufen.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis: Supplements Bundle
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Coriolis The Third Horizon - Quickstart
by Brian R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/21/2017 17:49:31

I finally got a chance to sit down and look at this. At first glance I thought, "Oh no another D6 game system based off the old storyteller system. But then I actually went deeper into the rules. This system is very close to one I had been developing on my own in my earlier twenties, and that got me rather excited again. This definetly looks like a very refreshing game setting, and I hope in the near future I can actually buy the PDF manual for this. Over all Modiphius has been coming out with a ton of Roleplaying games, that are games I would "Really want to try and play" . You folks are I think keep the RPG gaming genre alive and kicking. So thanks for the hard work.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Coriolis The Third Horizon - Quickstart
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Symbaroum - The Mark of the Beast
by Matt B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/21/2017 15:26:42

A complete and well written urban adventure. The premise is engaging and the flow and balance of problem solving to action is good. PCs will also get to meet some key NPCs (maybe) and experience a bit of the Thistle Hold landscape. I was a bit confused about a couple of the particulars about why and how the antagonist was doing what she was doing, but it didn't phase my players, so no big whoop.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Symbaroum - The Mark of the Beast
Click to show product description

Add to Pegasus Digital Order

Displaying 76 to 90 (of 123 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
Powered by DriveThruRPG