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Tales from the Loop RPG: Rulebook
by Daniele S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/21/2020 15:51:45

Here's my complete rewiew [ENG SUB] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RycnQxH_IjQ



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Tales from the Loop RPG: Rulebook
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100 Alternate Magic Mishap Table for Forbidden Lands
by Johan B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/18/2020 16:26:03

There is actually some fun consequenses here! Nicelly done with the implementation.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
100 Alternate Magic Mishap Table for Forbidden Lands
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Things from the Flood RPG: Rulebook
by Björn L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/15/2020 13:48:33

More mysteries of the Loop in darker times - a Mephisto review

Things from the Flood

The dreams and hopes of the 80s are over. The technical advances and miracles promised by the particle accelerator, known as the Loop, have not come true. A mysterious flood has turned part of Färingsö into a wasteland overnight. Because of the black water, possibly contaminated with strange substances, the area has been evacuated. Not only have the Loop's robots developed an anomaly called machine cancer sometime later, but this mysterious malfunction, resulting in tumor-like growth, has soon affected other machines as well. The Russian artificial intelligence program has proved a failure, and the last of these robots have fled and gone into hiding before being destroyed. Even the attempt to save the Loop by a take-over by the Krafta corporation was unsuccessful. And the company has not remedied the damages either. Also, the magnetrine ships, which promised so much potential as a flying, energy-saving means of transport, have eventually turned out to be a failure.

Things from the Flood continues Tales from the Loop, leading the roleplaying setting from the 1980s to the 1990s. While the 80s were still full of promise and optimism, these alternative 90s turn out to be a time in which these hopes were shattered. The characters who were still children in Tales from the Loop have now become teenagers - with all their advantages, but above all, with all their problems. The complicated relationships between the characters play a significant role, as well as their problems and the things they are ashamed of. As before, the characters are created from ten archetypes, defined by four attributes and several skills. The game mechanisms are simple: For the tests, attributes and skills are added for the dice pool. Every 6 rolled on the six-sided dice is a success. Fights do not really matter to the teenagers either - in a real fight; the characters have no chance. Accordingly, there are no health points or health levels but failed tests can cause the player characters to suffer so-called states leaving them scared or exhausted, which makes their tests more difficult. If things go very badly, permanent scars may remain, or player characters may even be eliminated from the game entirely.

While the basic system of rules is simple and pragmatic and fits well with the background, Things from the Flood takes an in-depth look at how individual stories need to be constructed to maintain the mysterious atmosphere of the game. The idea here is that the area around the Loop still holds countless secrets for the player characters to stumble into. The game tries to combine these mysterious elements, which revolve around strange machines, robots, time travel, or maybe even aliens, with the everyday problems of the characters. In keeping with the setting, in which many things seem to have gone wrong, the characters also have their teenage problems - be it families that break up, alcoholism of the parents, or even severe lovesickness.

While the book presents the 90s with some specified events, the focus to convey a certain atmosphere of the 90s. The primary setting is the Loop in Sweden or for the alternative scenario of the Loop in America (here it's a rupture of the Hoover Dam that leads to a flood). Some of the fictitious developments are presented as facts, but several elements remain open in such a way that the game master can find his own truth here - or simply leave these questions open.

The book then presents tips for playing the game. On the one hand, there is the so-called Mystery Landscape, which is intended as an open-world approach and puts many secrets on the map. It is up to the player characters which of these stories they want to explore. Besides, there are four complete adventures, which can be played individually or linked together and which pick up the primary themes of the game.

Of course, this book is also influenced by the illustrations by Simon Stålenhag, whose mixture of everyday motifs with strange technology perfectly conveys the atmosphere of the game. Actually, it is the other way round: the roleplaying game is inspired by the stunning visual worlds of Stålenhag.

For me, Things from the Flood is an excellent roleplaying game that creates a perfect combination of its elements. The mixture of the complicated teenager life with the 90s offers an intriguing setting. The idea of letting the player characters dive into mysterious conspiracies on the one hand, and on the other hand, still addressing their everyday problems creates a thrilling contrast. The rule mechanisms are accordingly simple but easy to understand and coherent so that, above all, the story stays on the centerstage. The design and development of the setting seem logical and offer an exciting world in which there is a lot to explore - also for the game master, who is given enough degrees of freedom to develop his own stories. This excellent approach combined with the outstanding illustrations, which offer a glimpse into a world that is so familiar on the one hand and yet so alien on the other hand, results in a roleplaying game that is really appealing to relive one youth in the 90s - enriched by robots, conspiracies, monsters and other things that for us back then only existed in the corresponding TV series. I think that Things from the Flood is an absolute recommendation and a real roleplaying highlight for those who are attracted to the genre.

(Björn Lippold)



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Things from the Flood RPG: Rulebook
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MUTANT: Year Zero - Roleplaying At The End Of Days
by Michal M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/09/2020 18:01:06

So I don't usually write reviews. But I just can't resist to tell anyone how great this RPG is. I am playing RPG for over 20 years now, and I have to say, that this game introduce a lot of great ideas. In my opinion a lot of RPGs this days are almost copy & paste ideas with different framework.

Mutant introduce new way of play, it's in some aspect similar to video games. That you explore the map (sectors), you are building a base, and there is a lot of random aspects etc. The first time I was reading this book I didn't recognize that there is a big Meta Plot behind whole game, and I love it. At first I thought that this game was just about "how to connect few One-Shoots into the game", but when I recognize the metaplot it turned upside down everything for me.

I think that rules are cool, and definitely also introduce new mechanics. As every RPG this one also have some flaws, but their are very minor. For example I think that there could more Roles in the book (we have 8 but to be honest no one want to play Slave, and Boss role is also very specific). Also I just run one scenario when we were using "all random", and it's just not working as you expect. It's slowing the game to much, so right now I just have ~10 random sectors prepared earlier, and when my players enter new sector I am just selecting (randomly) one of those.

I have already read 3 other books: Elysium, Mechatron, Genlab, and I love every one of them. The ideas are great, and reading every of them I am just crying to my pillow that I don't have time to run game in every one of those.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
MUTANT: Year Zero - Roleplaying At The End Of Days
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Forbidden Lands Core Game
by Érico C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/19/2020 13:27:08

A fantastic game, which simulates the feeling of an OSR game very well! Although too mechanized at times, the game delivers great fun and greater challenges!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Forbidden Lands Core Game
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Animal Expansion 1 for Genlab Alpha
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/16/2020 04:34:44

A fantastic update that adds a few new options for the animal mutants. The supplement is well written and designed well, have had the pleasure of adding a Duck and warthog mutants to a recent game and both were much loved!

Cannot wait for more content from this creator.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Animal Expansion 1 for Genlab Alpha
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Creator Reply:
That's awesome, thanks very much!
Mörk Borg English
by Wyatt S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/05/2020 18:34:16

To be blunt, Mork Borg is worth a buy. It's a rules-lite heavy metal rpg that is particularly interesting for the following reasons:

  • Mechanics and setting are effectively synergized, lending to more intuitive GM encounter management and game planning, in addition to more purposeful interactions and decisions made by players.
  • Very appealing aesthetic that is unconventional but consistent throughout. It's very pretty in both physical and PDF format (If you get the physical book from their website, they include a pdf for download on DrivethruRPG.)
  • It's an amazingly designed marvel of a product, and it is apparent that the designers, writers, and editors understand the rules of conventional design well enough to break them with purpose and intention. The design of this book is what initially sold me, and I think it serves as a valuable reference for implementing less conventional, more creative zine design in the perspective of style, layout, art presentation, and conveyed information.
  • Character creation is as easy as pressing a button. While there are intutitive rules for rolling up a new character, the Mork Borg website links to SCVMBIRTHER, a character generator for Mork Borg. In addition, the site offers a generous array of additional content in the form of adventure and setting supplements, additional monsters, and extra character classes.
  • It's player and GM friendly, meant to be accessible enough to pick up and play in a single evening.

It's been included in my essential reading for up and coming creators, designers, and tabletop rpg enthusiasts, and contains a lot of interesting, well-executed ideas.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mörk Borg English
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Mörk Borg English
by Simon H. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/03/2020 01:37:51

THIS is the game that you must have in your collection. The OSR-inspired rules are easy to understand and implement, and the gameplay experience is excellent. I'm not going to write a longer review because that will mean you will still be reading this rather than just buying and playing the game.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Slaves to Fate - Adventure for Symbaroum
by Marco C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/02/2020 07:30:52

Pretty good starting adventure for alternative characters races. Also good entry point for "not-heroes" / "not-good" campaing.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Slaves to Fate - Adventure for Symbaroum
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Slaves to Fate - Adventure for Symbaroum
by Charles B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/28/2020 13:38:01

I really enjoyed the adventure once my party was out of the slaver's hands, but I found the beginning clunky for me personally. Overall I'd HIGHLY recommend this, and even without the extended adventure it could easily work as a starting adventure for a new party. 8/10, would recommend.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Creator Reply:
Thanks Charles. Did you get to actually play or run it? I'm really excited that this adventure is getting some play time.
Mörk Borg English
by Jerry L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/25/2020 09:02:45

This is the game your parents worried about. It's gorgeous, it knows exactly what it wants to be and it crams absolute brilliance into every page. Absolutely fun and highly recommended. Be sure to read my full review here: http://dreadgazebo.net/mork-borg-review/



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mörk Borg English
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Slaves to Fate - Adventure for Symbaroum
by A customer [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/20/2020 10:57:07

Slaves to Fate is a 14-page adventure for Symbaroum that can be used as a stand-alone scenario or, more ideally, as the prelude to the Forever Winter saga.

In Slaves to Fate players find themselves at the center of a dire prophesy that leads to a frozen apocalypse known as the Forever Winter. Its also a dark and unforgiving adventure set in a dark and unforgiving setting, which by the way is part of its considerable appeal.

As the module begins, the PCs are slaves of a logging expedition intending to harvest lumber from the Everdark, a strange and horrifying forest. We’re quickly introduced to a new starvation rule which sets the tone for the adventure to follow; players will instantly realize they are in for a test of survival. While many other adventures have begun with PCs as slaves, its handled far better here than in most as players are given wide latitude in how they want to plot their escape. Its also dramatic: just as they begin to affect their escape the camp is set upon by beastmen that savagely rip everyone to bloody pieces. The newly-freed slaves must dive deeper into the forests if they wish to survive. Love that opening scene!

One of escapees—either a player character or NPC—is secretly an agent of a cult dedicated to bringing on the Forever Winter. This individual, known as the betrayer, secretly guides to party to a shrine deep in the forests where the ancient prophesy will be realized. There’s a wonderful opportunity for roleplaying here for a player who secretly takes this role, and because he is being controlled by a magical amulet which releases its hold once the Forever Winter is unleashed the character can continue forth in the campaign as a standard PC.

Here we’re also introduced to the Corruption rule, which tracks party members as they slowly fall under the sway of the amulet and become vassals in its ploy. Rolls are made but players shouldn’t know for what, which may cause paranoia among players. Adding to the paranoia is the sense that nature itself is against them: trees seek to entomb them, wolves attack, and redcaps (fey of the forest) shadow their moves.

The adventure culminates as the Forever Winter is unleashed. PCs are helpless to stop it; like the coming of seasons it is inevitable. Players may well feel a sense of doom and failure, but there is also the promise of a thrilling saga to come.

Layout is solid, with beautiful artwork bringing the adventure to life in all is dark glory. There are some editing and spelling mistakes, but they’re minor an easily overlooked for the strong storyline.

The best thing about this adventure? The grim mood, reminiscent of dark folklore, and the sense that one’s existence hangs on a razor-thin edge. Huge kudos for the atmosphere.

As a stand-alone adventure Slaves to Fate is a very good outing, but it truly comes into its own as the launch of an epic campaign.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Slaves to Fate - Adventure for Symbaroum
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Creator Reply:
Thanks so much for your review. We've went through the document and done another editing pass. We've caught several things that we overlooked. Hopefully this will make the document a solid 5/5 :) -- Jason
ALIEN RPG Core Rulebook
by Anton R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/17/2020 06:34:33

This book shows how surprisingly detailed and interesting the Alien setting actually is. It's far from just surviving a monster infestation on a starship. This game will open doors for you to explore many classic sci-fi and cyberpunk themes. It's a solid modern TTRPG that allows a fast paced, engaging narrative with just enough abstraction, and brings a new fresh Stress mechanic. A simple, but effective mechanic that will keep your players on the edges of their seats. Totally worth giving it a try, even if you're not a fan of the franchise.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
ALIEN RPG Core Rulebook
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ALIEN RPG Core Rulebook
by Jonathan S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/22/2020 14:12:58

Full review here: https://www.rpg.net/reviews/archive/18/18421.phtml

Probably best known for their award-winning Tales From The Loop (2017), Free League continues its tradition of implementing their six-sided dice pool mechanic, dubbed Year Zero Engine. The basic resolution method is to roll a number of six-sided dice based on your character's skills and attributes, with any roll of 6 being a success. Multiple successes allow your character to do extra things, called stunts. Characters have four attributes: Strength, Agility, Wits, and Empathy which can vary between 2 to 5 during character creation based on choice of career and allocation of starting points. A characters Health equals their Strength score. Each attribute has 3 skills associated with it. The skills and their associated attributes are fairly intuitive. For example, Close Combat is a skill under Strength, while Ranged Combat is associated with a character's Agility attribute. During character creation, players allocate a number of points to their skills, and based on their career choice, these skills levels will vary between zero and 3, at least initially. Future character advancement can bring a skill level up to 5.

There are 9 career options for characters in Alien: The Roleplaying Game. Careers include the iconic Colonial Marine and the less obvious Kid or Medic. Each career archetype comes with one key attribute (which allows a starting score of 5), 3 key skills (allows a starting score of 3), and 1 talent. The talent is chosen from a list of 3 options for each career and can be thought of as a feat which allows the character to do something outside the normal skill system. Upon character advancement, more talents can be acquired later. Starting characters are also given a selection of starting gear depending on the career chosen. It is interesting to note that android is not a career option, but the game does provide rules for synthetic player characters. Androids can have any career and can be open about their artificial nature or pretend to be human. Obviously, this secret would require some discussion with your GM as the rules are slightly different for synthetics.

While still utilizing the dice pool mechanic, the game designers have definitely ratcheted up the complexity when compared to Tales From The Loop. The biggest change is the addition of Stress Dice (also six-sided dice). As characters interact with the sci-fi/horror of the Alien universe, their Stress Level will increase; for example, by pushing rolls or seeing a Xenomorph. When a character attempts an action requiring a roll, the player will also roll a number of Stress Dice equal to their Stress Level. As with the normal dice pool, a Stress Die roll of 6 is also a success. However, a roll of 1 on a Stress Die requires a roll on the panic table to see what happens. So, the Stress Dice have two effects: one is to increase the chances of success, and the other is to provide a chance for the character to panic. Depending on the panic roll and current stress level, the character may start to tremble uncontrollably or go berserk and immediately attack the nearest person or creature. Of course, there are many other results on the panic table besides those two. I like the panic roll mechanic because even though it might take away player agency (at least temporarily), it does create interesting situations and forces the characters to really act out their fear in ways that the player might not be willing to.

The core rulebook provides dice pool game mechanics for almost all actions in the Alien world: skill rolls, armor and cover, running out of ammo and other consumables, spaceship combat, explosions, fire, decompression of a spaceship, and radiation. Initiative and critical injuries are two game mechanics that don't use the dice pool system. In this game, initiative order is handled with a simple card draw (regular playing cards could be used) and critical injuries are rolled on a table (2d6; 11 to 66) whenever a character is reduced to zero health.

Campaign vs Cinematic One of the biggest strengths of this game are the two different modes of play: campaign and cinematic. While both game styles utilize the same game mechanics, they are very different in feel and intent. Campaign mode is self-explanatory if you have played roleplaying games like D&D: A group of players work together to advance a larger story over many play sessions, while the characters themselves advance in skill or power. Cinematic play is intended to be a one-shot or a few sessions that emulate a movie in the Alien universe. Players select from pre-generated characters that are assigned motivations and goals for that particular scenario. Character's goals will sometimes conflict and so player versus player combat is likely. As in any Alien movie, character deaths will be common and even total party kills are possible. My favorite aspect to cinematic play is that due to its one-shot nature, it is possible to have a player or two pretend to be something or someone they are not and sabotage the party. Is that pilot actually a corporate spy from Weyland-Yutani? Is our science officer a xeno-loving synthetic trying to make sure the crew is expendable?

Aliens This book includes about 4 pages dedicated to the Engineers, but game statistics are not provided so the assumption is that characters will not be fighting the Engineers. Instead the book describes the architecture and the technology of the Engineers so the characters can stumble upon one of their colossal Juggernauts or explore their ancient temples. But what about the eponymous Aliens? All seven life stages of the Xenomorph are detailed and statted out (egg, face hugger, chestburster, etc). Nine different adult forms of Xenomorph (drone, soldier, worker, queen, etc) are provided to stalk your player's nightmares. Alien Covenant's Neomorphs are also included with 5 different stages from egg to adult. Perhaps the coolest wrinkle here is that the Xenos and Neos don't just make normal melee attacks, they have signature attacks that can be randomly determined by rolling on a table. These signature attacks do interesting things such as causing victims to drop their weapon or forcing a panic roll in addition to causing damage. And if that's not enough to keep your players on their toes, there are four other extrasolar species detailed in the corebook.

World Building One of the strongest aspects of this book is the amount of quality material that went into describing the Alien universe. To start, the inside cover provides a map of the galaxy, color-coded by controlling faction. There is an entire chapter dedicated to describing the governments and corporations of the Alien universe, including the quasi-governmental body, the Interstellar Commerce Commission. In order to provide places for your space truckers and colonial marines to explore, this book describes 21 different star systems and some systems have multiple worlds of interest. And if that's not enough, multiple pages of tables are provided for industrious gamemasters who want to create their own star systems and planetary bodies. These tables include size, atmosphere, temperature, terrain, and colony size. To assist in sandbox-style campaign play, more tables are provided for generating job missions and complications whether your group is made up of explorers, cargo haulers, or marines. If you need a base of operations for your campaign, Novgorod Station is detailed here with maps, interior details, 5 unexpected events to spark an adventure, and 4 key NPCs to interact with. After that, a short scenario with maps is provided, called Hope's Last Day. This could be played as a cinematic prequel to Aliens, since the scenario takes place in the Hadley's Hope colony prior to Ripley's second visit to the moon LV-426.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Symbaroum - Quick Start
by Robert N. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 01/19/2020 08:57:49

This is a cool system, d20 based opposed rolls for most tasks, apparently all done by the pc. I like how the attributes are also descriptors that can be called different things to explain how a character operates. The setting is very atmospheric, and some of the best art I've seen to paint a mental picture of this world. Really sets a feel and tone.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Symbaroum - Quick Start
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